Results tagged World Hunger

Know your candidates

The best way to get Congress to fix the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) is to make sure we elect people who know the facts and are ready to make a change.

Smarter Fuel Future Advocates’ Ethanol Warning Labels

Advocates for Smarter Fuel Future design warning label that show the horrors of ethanol.

World Hunger Day

World Hunger Day seems like an appropriate time to discuss what the EPA and Congress can do to positively impact those living in extreme poverty. In a discussion hosted by FoodPolicy.Us, panelists discussed the effects the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) is having on hunger domestically and abroad.

The Hall of Legislative Curiosities: Food or Fuel?

What happens when you use the world’s breadbasket to feed cars, not people? No surprise here: Less land for food means higher prices for you.

NGO’s respond to UN biofuels reversal

As we wait for the Environmental Protection Agency to make the final ruling on the 2014 Renewable Fuel Standard, the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reversed its stance on biofuels development in a report released this week.

The Cellulosic Bridge to Nowhere

Ethanol proponents have long claimed that advanced (cellulosic) biofuels will replace corn ethanol, resolving the emissions and hunger problems that corn ethanol causes. And yet, despite government mandates and subsidies, cellulosic biofuels are still not produced at any commercial scale.

Ghosts of Ethanol Past, Present and Future

Today, we divert more than 40 percent of our corn crops to ethanol. Further, government has been subsidizing “gasohol” for years. In 1979, the going rate was 40 cents per gallon of E10. And the final lesson is this: we’ve been hoping for cellulosic biofuels forever.

The Anti-Ethanol List Grows

Two Senators, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and Sen. Tom Coburn (R-OK), with almost opposite political points of view are coming together asking for reform on the ethanol mandate.

Stakeholder Press Call Previews EPA Hearing on RFS

On Wednesday, Dec. 4, a diverse group of stakeholders held a press call to discuss the EPA’s proposed reduction to 2014 biofuel blending requirements, as well as their individual policy objectives, as they seek to limit the various negative impacts of the RFS.

EPA Reduces 2014 Mandate for the First Time

On Friday, November 15, the EPA announced a reduction in the Renewable Fuel Standard, the first time this has happened since the policy began eight years ago. The proposed Renewable Fuel Standard will require refiners to blend about 15.21 billion gallons of biofuels into gasoline next year.

169 Bipartisan Members of Congress Urge EPA to Lower RFS

While we await the announcement of 2014 ethanol blending levels by the EPA, Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) filed a letter to Gina McCarthy, head of the EPA calling for adjustments to the Renewable Fuel Standard, with the support of 168 other members of Congress from both sides of the aisle.

Feeding our Tanks

Earlier this year, 80 civil society organizations, including ActionAid, Oxfam and more, wrote an open letter to the Committee on World Food Security urging the committee to recognize the problems with using the world’s food supply to feed our gas tanks.

Oxfam: CFS governments must face up to global thirst for biofuels which spell hunger for millions

Governments must put people’s right to food before short term commercial interests, said Oxfam before the opening of the Committee on Food Security’s annual meeting. Oxfam is calling for Governments to ensure that biofuel policies do not force poor farmers off their land and fuel food price spikes.

The Renewable Fuel Standard is Everyone’s Problem

Oil refiners oppose the ethanol mandate, but they are hardly the only ones who take issue with the policy. Environmentalists, tax payers, food producers and consumer protection groups of all types, anti-hunger advocates and even farmers have all spoken out against the RFS.

The Verge: Is ethanol starving Africa?

While the biofuel industry has grown over the past decade, ethanol and other biofuels have come under increased criticism in recent years, with some questioning their long-term environmental benefits, and others linking them to more urgent disasters: food shortages in the world's poorest countries.

The Baltimore Sun: Renewable fuel standard is too costly

Last year, more than 40% of the nation's corn crop went to ethanol production — not food — because the RFS requires more ethanol to be blended into our gasoline. This demand for corn has driven prices for the commodity up by 40% to the detriment of U.S. food producers and hungry families.

States take action against ethanol mandates

On Friday, September 13, California became the most recent state to take action against ethanol mandates. The state legislature unanimously passed AJR 21, which urged Congress to enact the RFS Reform Act of 2013, to alleviate the impact of rising feed costs for California dairy and poultry farmers.

Coming Together on Ethanol Mandates & Global Food Supply

As countries continue to prioritize gas tanks over stomachs, food insecurity is causing outrage and instability. Food price spikes between 2007 and 2008 have been directly linked to more than 60 food riots in 30 countries.

Boston Herald: Fuel policy wreaks global havoc

When crops such as corn are used to produce biofuels food and animal feed availability is reduced, food prices rise dramatically and hunger intensifies worldwide, as already impoverished people struggle to secure sustenance.

Big Ethanol Admits Biofuel Mandates Inflate Corn Prices

Yesterday, the head of the ethanol lobby Bob Dinneen testified in front of the House Energy and Commerce Committee on the Renewable Fuel Standard. Dineen admits that ethanol mandates were intended to raise the price of corn, costing consumers but lining corn growers' pockets.

It’s Time for America to Lead on the Coming Food Crisis: Ethanol Mandates & Global Food Supply

Current global food trends point to increased difficulties in feeding the world. A new study reveals that there won’t be enough food to feed the world by 2050. The USDA estimates that 101 million people – or nearly one in three Americans – are currently receiving food assistance of some kind.